Amarcord

Film/Video

Amarcord images courtesy of Janus Films

Amarcord

Federico Fellini, 1973

Divorce Italian Style

Pietro Germi, 1961

A Summer Abroad: Cinema italiano

Most of us won't be sunning on the Amalfi coast or dining near the Trevi Fountain this summer, but this series helps you imagine a splendid Italian holiday. Made by Italian filmmakers and/or filmed in Italy, the selection of classics and new releases features such outstanding directors as Fellini, Visconti, and De Sica and spectacular scenery from Rome, Venice, and the Italian countryside.<br><br><strong>Ticket Package</strong><br>Save when you buy 10 tickets to use at any indoor<a href="http://www.wexarts.org/fv/index.php?seriesid=257"><em>Cinema italiano</em></a>screening.<br>$60 general public<br>$40 members, students, and senior citizens

Thu, Aug 5, 2010 7 PM

"A movie made entirely out of nostalgia and joy, by a filmmaker at the heedless height of his powers."—Roger Ebert on Amarcord

"Captures the great Italian director at the peak of his cinematic powers.… A massively enjoyable entertainment infused with more than a little wry wisdom, pathos, and mystery."—Andrew O’Hehir, Salon.com, on Amarcord

Fellini's most personal film (the title means "I remember") captures a year of life in a small Adriatic town—very much like Rimini, where the director grew up. A young man grows up, his father lashes out against the Fascists, the town beauty gets married, and the town celebrates and mourns, in scenes that veer between magical beauty and signature Felliniesque excess. Set to an unforgettable score by Nino Rota, Amarcord won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film. (123 mins., 35mm)

"A comedy about the horrors of inertia…A perfect film."—Stuart Klawans on Divorce Italian Style

The outrageous comedy Divorce Italian Style was an international hit, and not just on the art-house circuit. The only place this hilarious and cutting satire on chauvinism did poorly was in southern Italy and Sicily, where it is set. The plot follows a married Baron (Marcello Mastroianni) who wants to marry his young cousin. But since divorce is illegal in Italy, the Baron schemes to drive his unlikable wife into the arms of another man so that he may justifiably murder her to save his honor. The film won an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay and was the first comedy from Pietro Germi (Seduced and Abandoned). (105 mins., 35mm)

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Jean Dubuffet, Vaches au pre (Cows in a meadow), 1954

Transfigurations: Modern Masters from the Wexner Family Collection closes Dec 31. Don't miss the exhibition artnet named among the world's 25 "must-see shows."

Artists featured in Transfigurations: Modern Masters from the Wexner Family Collection

Learn more about the artists represented in Transfigurations at our dedicated website. (Educators will also find curriculum resources to support their K–12 classrooms.)