Ballets Russes

Film/Video

Image courtesy of Zeitgeist Films

Ballets Russes

Dan Geller, Dayna Goldfine, 2005

New Documentary

Nonfiction filmmaking holds a strong appeal for many committed directors and producers. This ongoing series lets you sample wide-ranging approaches to the contemporary documentary.

Thu, Feb 23, 2006 7 PM
Sat, Feb 25, 2006 7 PM

Among the most compelling dance documentaries of recent years, Ballets Russes presents touching interviews and rare performance footage. The result is more than an abundance of archival treasures. It is an eloquent statement on the art of aging gracefully.
"Brings to life an era of unequaled artistic excitement."--Washington Post

The film starts with the 1929 death of dance impresario Sergei Diaghilev and the subsequent splintering of his troupe into two rival companies, the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and the Original Ballet Russe. Over the next decades, these troupes traveled the world, in war and in peace, bringing the high culture symbolized by ballet to devoted audiences while working with the era's leading composers and designers. The film's heart comes in the interviews with the surviving dancers, many of them now teachers looking back in astonishment at who they've been and what they've accomplished. As Artforum commented, "that process of transformation is intensely affecting and gives this film enormous depth." (118 mins.)

Viewing Transfigurations: Modern Masters from the Wexner Family Collection

The Wex is closed Thu, Dec 25, and Thu, Jan 1, but our galleries will be open Fri, Dec 26, through Tue, Dec 30, 10 AM–8 PM. Learn more about our holiday hours here.

Jean Dubuffet, Vaches au pre (Cows in a meadow), 1954

Transfigurations: Modern Masters from the Wexner Family Collection closes Dec 31. Don't miss the exhibition artnet named among the world's 25 "must-see shows."