You are here

Limite

Film/Video

Limite

(Mário Peixoto, 1931)

Via Brasil

Via Brasil is the Wexner Center’s multidisciplinary initiative focusing on contemporary art and culture in Brazil made possible by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Film History 101

As our film heritage becomes more and more digitized, it is harder and harder for audiences to see important films in the manner in which they were originally meant to be presented: in a theater, on film, with an audience. Film History 101 is our modest attempt to keep this tradition alive. Once a month, we'll present a selection that transcends "classic" status to that of "essential"—films that are widely recognized as among the greatest the art of moving pictures has to offer.

Via Brasil Film Series

Brazil’s contributions to the fields of music and dance are known throughout the world. But other than the occasional breakout hit, such as Black Orpheus, Central Station, or City of God, Brazilian cinema rarely receives the level of attention in North America that it deserves. This series offers you an extraordinary opportunity to tour the unique and diverse cinematic and cultural landscape that contributes to the increasing prominence of Brazil on the global (and local) scene.

Tue, Sep 18, 2012 7 PM

Voted the greatest Brazilian film ever made by the Cinemateca Brasileira in 1988 and championed by Orson Welles, Sergei Eisenstein, David Bowie, and Caetano Veloso, Limite has been lost for decades. Now, thanks to the World Cinema Foundation (founded by Martin Scorsese), the restored film has regained its reputation as a landmarks of the glorious final years of silent cinema. The only film directed by novelist Mário Peixoto (then in his early 20s), Limite captures the mental states of a man and two women lost at sea in a rowboat, with their pasts conveyed via flashbacks. But more than anything else, Limite is a piece of virtuoso filmmaking, a key film in Brazilian film history, and one of the great, adventurous examples of the power of silent cinema. (114 mins., 2K DCP)

Print courtesy Fondazione Cineteca di Bologna.