Pale Flower

Film/Video

Image courtesy of Janus Films

Pale Flower

Masahiro Shinoda, 1964

Caterpillar

Koji Wakamatsu, 2010

Kinema Japan

This series takes viewers to Japan, with selections that encompass the entire spectrum of Japanese filmmaking, from samurai classics to sci-fi stunners. Like last summer’s<em>Cinema italiano</em>series, it is intended as an introduction and homage to one of the world’s great film traditions. We’ve included works by some of the most revered Japanese directors, including Yasujiro Ozu and Akira Kurosawa, and by contemporary filmmakers, including Takashi Miike and Hirokazu Kore-Eda, as well as other films that represent Japan’s vital film history across several eras and genres.

Thu, Aug 4, 2011 7 PM

A yakuza (gangster) gem of the Japanese New Wave is paired tonight with Koji Wakamatsu's pointed commentary on the effects of war.

One of the darker entries among the films of the Japanese New Wave, Pale Flower follows a just-out-of-prison yakuza (gangster) who finds himself entangled with a sexy femme fatale addicted to gambling. The score is by the great Toru Takemitsu. (96 mins., 35mm)

Caterpillar depicts the deeply troubled relationship between a wife and her husband who returns from World War II limbless, deaf, and mute. Best known as a director of "pink films" (softcore sex and exploitation films), Wakamatsu has always been a vocal political and social critic, and Caterpillar serves as a pointed commentary on the devastating effects of nationalistic militarism. (85 mins., video)

Copresented by Ohio State's East Asian Studies Center.

Jean Dubuffet, Vaches au pre (Cows in a meadow), 1954

Transfigurations: Modern Masters from the Wexner Family Collection closes Dec 31. Don't miss the exhibition artnet named among the world's 25 "must-see shows."

Artists featured in Transfigurations: Modern Masters from the Wexner Family Collection

Learn more about the artists represented in Transfigurations at our dedicated website. (Educators will also find curriculum resources to support their K–12 classrooms.)