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Rio, 100 Degrees F.

Film/Video

Image courtesy of Arquivo Nacional

Rio, 100 Degrees F.

(Nelson Pereira dos Santos, 1955)

A Tribute to Nelson Pereira dos Santos

As the father of Brazil’s socially progressive and aesthetically daring Cinema Novo movement, Nelson Pereira dos Santos attempted to define a Brazilian national cinema through his politically engaged (and populist) body of work. This small retrospective welcomes the artist himself for two events and brings you five of his most important films. 

Via Brasil Film Series

Brazil’s contributions to the fields of music and dance are known throughout the world. But other than the occasional breakout hit, such as Black Orpheus, Central Station, or City of God, Brazilian cinema rarely receives the level of attention in North America that it deserves. This series offers you an extraordinary opportunity to tour the unique and diverse cinematic and cultural landscape that contributes to the increasing prominence of Brazil on the global (and local) scene.

Via Brasil

Via Brasil is the Wexner Center’s multidisciplinary initiative focusing on contemporary art and culture in Brazil made possible by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sat, Apr 6, 2013 7 PM

“As important to Latin American cinema as [Jean-Luc Godard´s] Breathless is to European film.”—Toronto International Film Festival

With his wildly influential debut, dos Santos brought to Brazil an unprecedented neo-realist look at class, race, and poverty—and dramatically launched his career as a revolutionary director when his film was abruptly suppressed by the Brazilian government. Rio, 100 Degrees F. follows a day in the lives of young, black peanut vendors as they move through Rio’s cityscape and social strata, from their homes in the favelas (portrayed honestly for the first time) to the city’s most affluent and tourist-filled neighborhoods. (100 mins., 35mm)