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The Petrified Garden


The Petrified Garden
Amos Gitai, 1993

Cinematheque: Amos Gitai

<i>Film Comment</i>calls Amos Gitai"Israel's most internationally recognized filmmaker--and its most controversial,"and this nine-film retrospective includes some of his provocative works. Gitai uses both documentary and fictional styles to tell stories of Israeli life and the Jewish Diaspora, frequently daring to speak some unpopular truths. The Wexner Center has shown such recent Gitai films as<i>Kadosh</i>and<i>Kippur,</i>but this series provides an illuminating cross-sampling of his entire career, now entering its third decade.

Thu, Jan 24, 2002 7 PM

In The Petrified Garden, one of his least-seen pictures, Gitai again returns to the legend of the Golem and the theme of exile, this time in post-Soviet Russia.
Set in Russia after the fall of the Soviet Union, The Petrified Garden follows an art dealer who travels to Leningrad/St. Petersburg and Birobidzhan (Stalin's Siberian "homeland" for the Jews). There he hopes to reunite a huge sculpted hand that he's inherited with the rest of a mythical statue. With Hanna Schygulla and a score by Simon and Markus Stockhausen. (87 mins.)

Picture Lock: 25 Years of Film/Video Residencies at the Wex

Learn more about our four-day celebration of the Film/Video Studio here (then grab a Festival Pass for admission to all screenings and conversations here). 

The Decline of Western Civilization

Don't miss your chance to see filmmaker Penelope Spheeris introduce her iconic The Decline of Western Civilization on Friday, October 23—get your tickets now.