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Prisoner of the Iron Bars, High-Rise

Film/Video
Prisoner of the Iron Bars

Prisoner of the Iron Bars

Image courtesy of Olhos de Cão

Prisoner of the Iron Bars

Prisoner of the Iron Bars

Image courtesy of Olhos de Cão

Prisoner of the Iron Bars

Prisoner of the Iron Bars

Image courtesy of Olhos de Cão

High-Rise

High-Rise

Image courtesy of FiGa Films

High-Rise

High-Rise

Prisoner of the Iron Bars
High-Rise

(O prisioneiro da grade de ferro—Retratos, Paulo Sacramento, 2003)
(Um lugar ao sol, Gabriel Mascaro, 2009)

Via Brasil

Via Brasil is the Wexner Center’s multidisciplinary initiative focusing on contemporary art and culture in Brazil made possible by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Cruzamentos: Contemporary Brazilian Documentary

Cruzamentos: Contemporary Brazilian Documentary continues with visits from some of the most prominent filmmakers working in Brazil today. Developed in conjunction with the exhibition currently on view in our galleries, this series offers an unprecedented opportunity to discover one of the most vital—and seldom seen—documentary traditions happening anywhere in the world.

Wed, Jan 29, 2014 7 PM
Wed, Jan 29, 2014 9:10 PM

“It’s hard to express in words what our life is like in here, perhaps images work better.”—O prisioneiro da grade de ferro—Retratos
 
São Paulo’s Carandiru Penitentiary was the most infamous in South America. Not only because it was the largest prison on the continent, but also because of the bloody massacre that occurred there in 1992, when a police action killed 111 prisoners. At the time of its demolition in 2002, Carandiru contained 7,000 prisoners even though it was designed to hold 4,000. Not long before its destruction, filmmaker Paulo Sacramento held video workshops with prisoners and taught them how to record their daily lives. The resulting documentary, and the shocking conditions it depicts, offers a uniquely radical and moving experience. (123 mins., 35mm)
 
What does it mean to have a penthouse apartment in Brazil, one of the most financially unequal countries in the world? The exciting young filmmaker Gabriel Mascaro invites us into the high-rise homes of the privileged, interviewing residents of nine penthouse apartments across Brazil about topics personal, political, and economic. A strikingly photographed study of Brazil’s architectural development, the film provides unguarded insights into the world and worldviews of Brazil’s elite, as well as the increasing verticalization and urbanization of the nation’s landscape. (73 mins., video)