Past Film/Video

Series & Festivals

Cousin Bobby

(Jonathan Demme, 1992)

New digital restoration

parallax image

“Runneth over with kindness...Pure Demme!”—Rolling Stone

Jonathan Demme’s death shocked the film community last April. Best known for his features (including the Oscar-sweeping The Silence of the Lambs) and concert films (the iconic Stop Making Sense and Neil Young: Heart of Gold), Demme was also deeply committed to making humanist, progressive documentaries.

Ripe for rediscovery, Cousin Bobby ranks among Demme’s finest, most generous documentaries—and the best unknown films of the 1990s. The Reverend Robert “Bobby” W. Castle (Demme’s cousin) is an Episcopalian minister in Harlem who became a controversial figure due to his ties with the Black Panther party and the civil rights movement. What starts off as a portrait film becomes a powerful and incisive look into systemic oppression in America. Ultimately, the film—like many of Demme’s best—offers a glimpse at how true communities are formed. (70 mins., digital video)

a priest talking

Cousin Bobby, image courtesy of Sundance Now.

a priest standing in the aisle of a bus

Cousin Bobby, image courtesy of Sundance Now.

SEASON SUPPORT FOR FILM/VIDEO

Rohauer Collection Foundation

 

SUPPORT FOR THE FILM/VIDEO STUDIO PROGRAM 

Institute of Museum and Library Services 

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

National Endowment for the Arts 

 

GENERAL OPERATING SUPPORT FOR THE WEXNER CENTER

Greater Columbus Arts Council

Ohio Arts Council

The Columbus Foundation

Nationwide Foundation

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Past   Film/Video

Cousin Bobby